Rogue's Gaming
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Hello once again gamers,


Things have been progressing quickly over the last month or so! What with bringing new staff on board, preparing for this year's Dragonmeet convention, and filling our RPG tables with some players who are brand new to the hobby. The latter got us thinking about how we teach our friends and family about the hobbies we enjoy, whether it's miniature painting, RPG character creation and game mechanics, or simply the joys of deckbuilding...


For the "green" and uninitiated hobbyist these things can be daunting, and sometimes a struggle. But fear not, with the wealth of tutorials and help out there in stores and online, it's never been easier to get into the more creative side of our favourite games. So with that in mind, I would like to hand you over to Owen of Project Fumble; an experienced stalwart of our local gaming community and a firm friend of ours. Behold, as he takes you through a series of tutorials; the first being a simple, but effective (and not to mention, nostalgic), scenery build. 


Happy Gaming! - Rogue


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Let me take you back to one of my earliest memories as a Wargamer, back to a time when we had to make our own terrain; a time of foamboard, cardboard, PVA glue and flock [1]. Let me take you back to a time when Warhammer 40,000 looked like this:




There is one particular piece of terrain everpresent in White Dwarf and Codexes from this era that I'd always wanted to recreate. You know the one. The one that could cause as much bodily harm as treading on a regiment of goblin spearmen [2]. That's right, the spiky alien cactus thing...

Here's my recreation of this classic, followed by a tutorial so you lovely folks can try making these at home too! 

 

You will need the following:



Start by cutting off the bottom from your polystyrene eggs with your cutting tool to give them a flat base to sit on. Use your hot glue gun [3] to glue them to your bases.



 

Once these are stuck firmly, start cutting some cocktail sticks and sticking them strategically into the polystyrene eggs in a semi-even fashion. You shouldn't need to use any glue to secure them.

 

 



You may wish to fill in any large gaps in the polystyrene with base filler. This isn't required, but it makes them look a bit more natural. 


Paint your wonderful creation with a couple of coats of your chosen of green - I used the appropriate choice of 'Jungle Green' - followed by painting the spikes with a base of brown, then red. Spread some PVA glue over the base of the egg and dip into your chosen flock. 


 


And there you go, some homemade alien jungle plant things to use in your games of Warhammer. The perfect way to take your games back to 1995. Happy gaming folks.



[1] Seriously everything was covered in green flock. If you didn't have Goblin Green base rims with a generous coating of flock you'd definitely attract some strange looks.


[2] A level of pain rivalled only by treading barefoot onto unexpected floor Lego.


[3] I borrowed my buddy Elliot's one. He says he prefers the cheap Chinese ones. "The safe ones just don't get hot enough" he said.

The Fighting Fantasy Fest
A once every three year event, bringing the haze of the past back to the present...
The Game Trail Continues, and this time there's miniatures on the loose!
Dragonmeet was a blast, and our range of miniatures went down a storm!...
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